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Kali Ciesemier

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4th
Mar
Tue
  • eddyjames asked: please come to tcaf next year.

    I’m gonna try! Sam & I are going to apply for a table!

    Tags:
    Notes: 18
  • 4th
    Mar
    Tue

    I’m selling all my ASOIAF pieces as prints at the Ltd Art Gallery “WINTER IS COMING” show! They are all available online as easily frameable 8x10 giclee prints on watercolor paper for $20 each, should you like to buy one. They’re each limited to only 25 prints, too!

    In the past I haven’t offered all of these for sale as prints because the original files were kinda small, but I went back in and reformatted, tweaked colors, and cleaned everything up.

    After the show is over I will likely offer these as 12x15 or 12x18 prints in my inprnt store, but if you want an 8x10 THEN NOW IS THE TIME!

    3rd
    Mar
    Mon

    OSCARS
    Pretty self explanatory opening illo, for the Boston Globe! Thanks as always to my art director Ryan Huddle!

    Tags: illustration oscars 
    Notes: 295
    27th
    Feb
    Thu
  • caseyboots asked: Hey Kali- about your last post- I'm wondering if you can give a good example of an email you'd send to an AD to introduce yourself and your work. How would you word that? When you take time to grant sage advice..well, everyone really appreciates it. Thanks.

    Hey Casey! I’m glad! Though as a caveat I wanna say I still don’t have all my shit sorted, and I’m no super-famous/millionaire illustrator (YET?!), but I try to give advice from my own experience :)

    So, email! People have different takes—if you’re funny and clever or can say something original/fun in an email to an art director, go for it! If you met the AD somewhere, or have some other tidbit of personal connection, mention that!

    When in doubt, keep it short and sweet, a couple sentences is fine. Say hello, and then something like:

    I’d love to work with you!

    and/or

    I wanted to share some recent illustrations!

    and/or

    Let me know if my work is a good fit for any projects you’ve got going!

    Etc. etc.

    But be sure to ALWAYS include a link to your online portfolio, that’s the most important part. An art director is ultimately going to hire you for the quality of your work—the email (or postcard) is just wrapping paper. You could also include 3 jpgs of specific work they might be interested in, too (don’t make ‘em email-bustingly large tho) Some ADs are more fond of email attachments than others.

    Tags: how-to advice 
    Notes: 154
  • 27th
    Feb
    Thu
  • miss-atrocity asked: Hey Kali, I'm an illustration student at MICA, and I was wondering if you live off of being an artist, and how exactly that works? How you get hired for enough jobs? I'm just really concerned about the future haha

    Hey there! I do live off being an artist! The rest of my answer is kinda long, but I’ll give it my best shot.

    How it works: It’s tough in the beginning, but it gets better. You probably already know that you need to promote yourself in order to get jobs—email ADs, network, send postcards, get involved in social media, make a website. You build up a base of jobs, one at a time. Sometimes you may get repeat jobs from one client, or maybe a bunch of random jobs from various people. Some people’s work is more suited to a particular section of illustration—book covers, business-y editorial, kid’s work, whatever. (figuring out where your work fits or where you want it to fit can take some time, but it’s good to have some goals!)

    Eventually a snowball effect happens—after a few years art directors contact YOU now, once your work starts to be seen more and more. Which is nice!

    Now, the money management part during all these times is where it can get a bit tricky. Usually at the beginning you need another job, preferably part-time so you still have time to work on whatever freelance jobs you can get. When I first graduated I worked part-time as a concept artist at a local videogame company, which paid my rent while I was contacting editorial AD’s and getting a tiny trickle of freelance work. (heads-up—this part is hard. Working any 2 jobs is hard!)

    Living in Baltimore helped because cost of living is cheap. I also had been saving money in a savings account since I was a kid (any holiday/birthday/summer job money went into the bank). 8 months after graduation, the videogame I was working on was cancelled and I was let go from the company, so I decided to give full-time freelance a shot. Luckily I had that nest-egg of saved money to help get me through a lot of rough patches in the beginning, and over time I’ve been able to keep a relatively stable amount of savings to tide me over slow months. It always seems like I’ll get a bunch of jobs one month, and very little another month. Because of that instability, it’s important to recognize that you need to be frugal! (and also take opportunities when they come!)

    Recently, I’ve been thinking about how I can change the direct time-to-money relationship that pervades illustration. I’m kinda slow at drawing, so it limits the number of jobs I can take on & the money I can make. One small thing I’ve been doing is selling prints—which means that I can reuse some of the illustrations I’ve already made and make additional money from them. Making my own book or product seems like a smart move, since I could get continuing royalties off it. I’ve also heard some illustrators talk about selling some of their old work as stock images.

    Getting into finances is smart, too. I’m lucky to have an uncle at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, and every year I put some of my earnings in my Roth IRA account (so I’ll have some income when I’m old and decrepit) and I also have some money invested in stocks. I really think that art school should come with financial classes for artists—money stuff can be complicated and intimidating, but it can also be important for your future comfort & happiness. I’m just scratching the surface right now, there’s a lot I don’t know!

    In any case, short answer: Keep working, save your $$$, and look for additional opportunities to make bank ✧

    Tags: how-to advice 
    Notes: 650
  • 26th
    Feb
    Wed

    *✧Gemstones*✧ for Nautilus Magazine

    "Precious stones hold the stories of continents, oceans, and cultures"— Read the article online!
    The article highlights 5 gemstones and weaves together their formation with cultural stories that have been created about the stones. For instance, did you know Middle Ages fables say that diamonds were “guarded by venomous creatures who wounded themselves on the stones’ sharp crystalline points, saturating them with venom” (WHAT?! Awesome.)
    Many thanks to my AD Len Small for this super fun project!

    Sidenote: I couldn’t resist the sparkles as a tiny tip of the hat to the Crystal Gems & all the inspiring artists in the Steven Universe crew

    Tags: Illustration Nautilus 
    Notes: 1246
    20th
    Feb
    Thu
  • fish702 asked: Dear Kali, I live in Las Vegas but am hopping on a plane to attend Ltd Art Gallery's ASOIAF show in Seattle as Game of Thrones is just about my favorite passion. I was wondering If you would be able to reveal your piece or possibly the price of it as I am planning on buying as many of the prints as possible and it has been quite difficult to pull a preview from Ltd. Thanks in advance if this is at all possible and great luck at the show…maybe I shall see you there. Cheers,Steven

    Hi Steven, I hope you have a great time at the show! I’m super excited to see what people have made for it! Unfortunately I’m clear across the country and won’t be able to attend in person. I’ve been both overworked and pretty sick lately, and although I’ve tried I haven’t been able to finish a new print for the show. (which has been a big bummer)

    However: All 5 of my previous ASOIAF pieces will be for sale as 8x11 prints (in case you’d like the Leech Lord eyeing you while you go about your business)

    Tags:
    Notes: 19
  • 17th
    Feb
    Mon
  • BURGERLAB
An illustration about the future of synthetic food, for STET! Sadly Editorially, the parent publisher of STET, is closing its doors, so my illustration will go unreleased. Best wishes to the crew on their future adventures.

Good news is, that teardrop bun is probably the most satisfying thing I’ve drawn to date.
And hello new followers! Many thanks to Aaron for his kind post!

    BURGERLAB
    An illustration about the future of synthetic food, for STET! Sadly Editorially, the parent publisher of STET, is closing its doors, so my illustration will go unreleased. Best wishes to the crew on their future adventures.

    Good news is, that teardrop bun is probably the most satisfying thing I’ve drawn to date.
    And hello new followers! Many thanks to Aaron for his kind post!

    Tags: Illustration Burger 
    Notes: 414
  • 30th
    Jan
    Thu
  • In the time between closing my eyes and falling asleep, sometimes I end up having what I call “image flashes”, fully realized color images that appear in my mind’s eye and then disappear. I’ve since learned that this is a common effect of hypnagogia (you’ve probably had some hypnagogic experiences too!) 

Some images are clearer than others, and when they are I try to jot down a scribble in my bedside notepad, to remember them later.
This bat babe is an image flash I had over the summer, and I finally got around to drawing her yesterday!

(I also added her to my INPRNT store)

    In the time between closing my eyes and falling asleep, sometimes I end up having what I call “image flashes”, fully realized color images that appear in my mind’s eye and then disappear. I’ve since learned that this is a common effect of hypnagogia (you’ve probably had some hypnagogic experiences too!)

    Some images are clearer than others, and when they are I try to jot down a scribble in my bedside notepad, to remember them later.
    This bat babe is an image flash I had over the summer, and I finally got around to drawing her yesterday!

    (I also added her to my INPRNT store)

    Tags: illustration hypnogogia 
    Notes: 1031
  • 14th
    Jan
    Tue

    eyezonthepiez:

    For someone with a big sweet tooth, I actually haven’t baked much.
    I’ve been thinking a lot about my wonderful Grandmas and all the ladies who came before me, cooking food for their families and passing down recipes through the ages. I want to know those secrets, I want to be a part of that chain!
    Also, I’m very excited to, y’know, eat a pie every week.

    THIS WEEK’S PIE: Freckled Apple PIe!

    NOTES: I had the benefit of my Grandma C’s recipe for her tasty Apple Pie. It’s the one and only pie that I have had practice with, though when I made it before it didn’t turn out as well as Grandma’s (of course). This time I modified the recipe and added 1 1/4 c extra sharp cheddar cheese to the crust. The cheese made the crust extra-crumbly, so there was a lot of patching involved, but when it baked all the little cheese bits browned like freckles!

    APPLE TALK: 3 McIntosh, 3 big Granny Smiths, and 1/2 of a Golden Delicious went into this. Gram tells me that the McIntosh break down to make the filling, while the Granny Smiths add tartness and structure. PIE SCIENCE! I added the Golden Delicious just ‘cuz ☆☆☆

    OVERALL: I reall ylike how it turned out— the crust was subtly cheesy, and the extra flavor worked nicely with the apples. But it also took me 5 HOURS to make, which seems…excessive. Gotta work on that!

    - Kali

    Hey! This is my first post from EYES ON THE PIES, a joint tumblr started by the supremely talented Eleanor Davis & myself. We’re each baking a pie every week, so it’s gonna be all pies all the time! Stay tuned for misadventure, triumph, and pie gifs.

    Tags:
    Notes: 217
    Reblogged from eyezonthepiez
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    Accent Red by Neil Talwar